Thermaltake Smart SE 630W Power Supply Review

The Smart SE 630W is a low-cost semi-modular Power Supply that offers high power delivery and efficiency, how does it fare?

Thermaltake Smart SE 630W Power Supply Review

At first glance, one might thought the panel is filled with modular cable connection ports but it isn’t so. 🙂 Those on the left are just guides on where to put the cables. 😀

Thermaltake Smart SE 630W Power Supply Review

The red ones are for the PCI-E connector while the black ones are for other components.

Here’s the view of the exhaust.

Thermaltake Smart SE 630W Power Supply Review

The SmartSE 630W comes with 5 cables, 2 for SATA, 1 for 4-pin Molex and 2 for PCI-E.

Thermaltake Smart SE 630W Power Supply Review

Unlike other modular PSU like the Cooler Master V700 where a single PCI-E cable comes with 2x 8pin PCI-E connector, the PCI-E cables on the SmartSE 630W comes with only a single 8-pin connector on each cable.

Here’s the power delivery of the PSU.

Thermaltake Smart SE 630W Power Supply Review

And here’s the spec.

Thermaltake Smart SE 630W Power Supply Review

One thing to note is that neither the box nor the official product page highlights anything about safety measures like overload protection and circuit protection.

Test Methodology / Report

goldfries.com does not have industrial grade power supply testing tools, therefore the approach for the PSU test is from a consumer angle. This means the PSU will be pushed to operational limit based on components that are available in the market. The key components used for power draw are the CPU (choice of processor), the GPU (graphic card setup) and other components like fans and drives.

The stress test is performed by stressing the 12V rails with 80% to 90% load, and run no less than 8 hours which is a lot more stress than what the average consumer would place on a power supply over the course of months or even years.

The Thermaltake Smart SE 630W delivers 588 Watts over the 12V rails so the target power draw should be around 470 Watts. The Thermaltake Smart SE 630W is rated to be 82% – 87% efficient depending on load, the wall readings based on the target watt of 470 should be at least 574. The processing load was generated by running [email protected] and Furmark Burn-in Test.

The test system comprises of an AMD FX-9590 processor and 1x Gigabyte Windforce R9 280X units and 4 units of high RPM fan.

The initial readings went up to 660 watts from wall reading, that gave me a shock of my life as it seems to be around 98% which is an extremely high load and the system still went on. I decided not to take any risk on this as it’s beyond common sense to push such load on a sub RM 300 PSU with no details of protection.

In the end I settled for around 600 watts wall reading which comes to almost 90% load of which it did not fail.

The earlier setup didn’t work well with OCCT test so I lowered the processor to FX-8350 and below are the readings from OCCT 4.4.0 for the 3.3v, 5v and 12v. The 12v reading went beyond the 5% tolerance for ATX Specifications on load as it drops below 11.4 .

Thermaltake Smart SE 630W Power Supply Review

Thermaltake Smart SE 630W Power Supply Review

Thermaltake Smart SE 630W Power Supply Review

The PSU was reasonably cooling, the fan wasn’t manage to keep things running without being loud.

The Verdict

The Thermaltake Smart SE 630W retails at RM 269. The PSU is semi-modular and comes with flat type cables for cable management purpose, it also does great in high power delivery BUT my concern is how the 12V drops quite far beyond 11.4 and there’s no details on circuitry protection.

It is ideal for users to build a home or office system for 24/7 stable demands.

For a better PSU at that price, you should be looking at the non-modular but critically acclaimed FSP Raider 650w for the sake of your computer’s well-being.

Remember – power and modular design isn’t as important as good power delivery with protection.

goldfries rated this product :